Archives: June 2016

Our Released Five Adapt Well

June 28, 2016. Posted in Article

Our PRM team from Nles Mamse Camp recently reported that Gadis, Hope, Raymond, Kenji, and Angely – who were released from Samboja Lestari to the Kehje Sewen Forest on May 28 – have been adapting well to their new habitat. All five orangutans have been observed actively moving through the trees and foraging well.

Angely, Hope, Kenji and Raymond have been frequently seen exploring alone, while Gadis has been spending time with orangutans that were previously released in the forest, namely Long and Arief.

Gadis Makes Friends with Arief and Long

On her first day of release, Gadis quickly moved away from her release point and out of range of our PRM team. However, over the past few weeks our team have caught up with Gadis and observed her interacting closely with Long and her adopted son Arief, who were released in September 2015. Gadis seemed comfortable alongside Long and Arief, and was seen to be spending her time exploring, foraging and dangling from the trees with them. The three were also spotted together near the river.

Gadis, Arief, and Long

Arief, who hasn’t left Long’s side since they met in Forest School Level 1, seemed somewhat jealous of Gadis and the two appeared to fight several times. Wise, mother figure Long was there to split them up and calm them down.

Gadis and Long interacting together near the river

Angely and Kenji Prefer to be Alone

In contrast to Gadis, who easily befriends other orangutans, Angely and Kenji prefer to spend time alone. On different occasions, our team saw Ajeng – who was released in September 2015 – approach Angely and Kenji, who both went out of their way to avoid her.

Angely appeared to resent Ajeng’s presence and moved away from her to explore other areas of the forest, while Kenji expressed his dislike by throwing twigs at her. Ajeng did not seem to understand the gesture and came closer instead. Kenji then lashed out at Ajeng, who then got the message loud and clear, and left him alone.

Our PRM team have noted that both Angely and Kenji are skilful foragers in the Kehje Sewen Forest and enjoy all the natural food on offer, such as Baccaurea, Artocarpus fruits, liana flowers, termites, bamboo and various other types of flora.

Angely eating Baccaurea sp.

Kenji eating Artocapus

Hope Approaches Ajeng

A day after her release, Hope was observed spending the majority of his time resting in a nest and would only move to find food. However, he has since started becoming more active up in the trees foraging for forest fruits and playing with newfound friend Ajeng.

The PRM team witnessed an encounter between Hope and Ajeng a week after Hope was released; initially he seemed frightened of Ajeng, as she approached in a rather forward manner. Since that first meeting, Hope and Ajeng have become very close – they now eat, explore, play and build nests in trees nearby one another.

Hope (left) and Ajeng (right)

Raymond Savours Jabon and Ferns

After release, Raymond was seen to be spending most of his time exploring and foraging. Once, he bumped into Hanung, a male released in December 2015. When they met, they exchanged sharp looks and their hair stood up on end. A fight soon took place.

Larger Hanung won the physical contest hands-down and Raymond fled to Puncak Palem area, about 500 meters from Hanung’s territory. From that point on, Raymond backed away from Hanung whenever he saw him.

From the team’s observations, it is clear that Raymond is having a love affair with jabon fruits and ferns, enjoying both in abundance!

Raymond eating pakis fern

We are thrilled to see the released orangutans adapting well to their new environment and thriving in the Kehje Sewen Forest. We hope every orangutan undergoing rehabilitation – be it at Samboja Lestari or Nyaru Menteng – will follow in their released friends’ footsteps, and return to this beautiful natural habitat.

Text by: PRM team of Camp Nles Mamse, Kehje Sewen Forest

In celebration of the BOS Foundation’s 25th anniversary this year, we hope that the orangutans will continue to live safely in their new natural habitat. We will do our best to continuously monitor their progress and look forward to some new exciting reports on their adaptation this year! You can keep support our team and our monitoring activities. DONATE NOW to BOS Foundation and make a difference to the future survival of orangutans!

A Mother’s Bond

June 23, 2016. Posted in Article

After several days of being out of radio tracking range, our Camp Lesik PRM team in Kehje Sewen Forest located Yayang and her baby, Louise, close to the camp one afternoon after finishing a patrol round. The team began to collect ‘found-to-nest’ data, which involves observing a located orangutan up to the point when he/she builds their night nest. That evening, Yayang built her nest only 250 metres from Camp Lesik.

The following day, Yayang and Louise spent most of their time up in the trees where Yayang busily consumed liana fruits. Around noon, the two moved toward the Telen River.

Yayang eating liana fruit

A short time afterwards, the team spotted movements across the river, which turned out to be Hamzah, Casey and Sayang moving through the trees. Long separated from her mother (Yayang), Sayang seemed eager to meet up with her and her baby sister. Yayang kept going about her business while keeping a keen eye on the approaching Sayang.

Yayang and Louise up in the trees

At first, a strong current seemed to deter Sayang from crossing the river. However, she cleverly hung on to tree branches as she stepped across the large river rocks and gave it a go.

Sayang busily eating Lithocarpus sp. before attempting to cross the Telen River

Sayang slowly made her way across the river and then quickly went up to meet Yayang and Louise. All three appeared happy to be in each other’s company. Sayang seemed to be very fond of Louise and played with her little sister, repeatedly nuzzling her face and gently touching her hands.

Sayang playing with Louise

The sky was clear that day, and the good weather gave Yayang and Sayang the chance to roam the forest together for the remaining daylight hours. They ended the day building their nests close to each other. The trio stayed together for the next few days and Sayang was observed sharing her food with Louise on a number of occasions.

As our team witness regularly, the bond between an orangutan mother and her child is strong and even in later life, especially among the mothers, daughters, sisters and aunts, they often meet up and spend time in each other’s company. It is great to see Sayang return to spend time with her mother and sister like a wild female orangutan would.

Text by: PRM team in Camp Lesik, Kehje Sewen Forest

In celebration of the BOS Foundation’s 25th anniversary this year, we hope that the orangutans will continue to live safely in their new natural habitat. We will do our best to continuously monitor their progress and look forward to some new exciting reports on their adaptation this year! You can keep support our team and our monitoring activities. DONATE NOW to BOS Foundation and make a difference to the future survival of orangutans!

Lesan Becomes a Mother!

June 14, 2016. Posted in Article

Lesan, one of the first orangutans released by the BOS Foundation to the Kehje Sewen Forest in 2012, was recently spotted holding a newborn baby! We have yet to determine whether the baby is a boy or girl, but this is the second natural birth among our released orangutans in the Kehje Sewen Forest!

We first spotted the new infant on 8 June when Usup and Awal, from our PRM team, were finishing a day of monitoring Yayang and her baby Louise, not far from Camp Lesik. They noticed slight movements coming from up in the trees, and after a closer look saw Lesan with a tiny, reddish-brown baby clinging to her belly. Usup and Awal immediately began taking notes and observed Lesan with her baby until she made her night nest.

Back in October 2015, our PRM team had noted that Lesan showed signs of potential pregnancy, although they were unable to collect a urine sample to determine this.

Lesan came to Samboja Lestari in November 2006, when she was just three years old. After a long period of rehabilitation, she was released into Kehje Sewen Forest on April 23, 2012, at the age of nine. Since her release, Lesan has grown into an amazing individual, and we are delighted to learn she has become a mother.

Protective Instincts

The day after the discovery of Lesan’s baby, Handoko and Usup ventured out to collect more detailed data through nest-to-nest observations on the pair; they recorded information on Lesan’s activities for the entire day – from the time she woke up until she built another night nest. Both mother and baby appeared to be in good health, and Lesan was seen eating many shoots on the ground.

While she was eating shoots, Lesan was approached by Casey, who tried to touch the baby. However, Lesan would not allow it. Not long after this interaction, Yayang approached with Louise clinging to her belly, but Lesan quickly climbed up a tree and moved off deeper into the forest with her baby.

Casey, Lesan, dan bayinya

Lesan and her baby with Casey

Lesan rested at noon up in the trees, still holding her infant close. After resting, Lesan returned to the ground to eat more shoots. She moved toward the other side of the forest near Camp Lesik in the afternoon and built her night nest there.

The birth of Lesan’s baby follows that of Louise to Yayang in July last year (Read the full story here: Breaking News: Yayang has Given Birth to a New Baby!). This second birth is much-welcomed news and gives us hope for East Kalimantan orangutan populations in the future.

We hope Lesan and her baby will remain in good health together in the Kehje Sewen Forest.

Text by: PRM team in Camp Lesik, Kehje Sewen Forest

In celebration of the BOS Foundation’s 25th anniversary this year, we hope that the orangutans will continue to live safely in their new natural habitat. We will do our best to continuously monitor their progress and look forward to some new exciting reports on their adaptation this year! You can keep support our team and our monitoring activities. DONATE NOW to BOS Foundation and make a difference to the future survival of orangutans!

World Environment Day Marked with the Release of Five Orangutans

June 7, 2016. Posted in Article

On May 27, the BOSF Orangutan Reintroduction Program from Samboja Lestari released five orangutans to the Kehje Sewen Forest in the East Kutai and Kutai Kertanegara Regencies of East Kalimantan. Through this release event we celebrate World Environment Day, which takes place on June 5.

The release was officiated with a press conference held at Samboja Lodge and attended by the BOS Foundation’s CEO, Dr. Ir. Jamartin Sihite together with the Head of the East Kalimantan BKSDA, Ir. Sunandar Trigunajasa N; the GM of PT Pupuk Kaltim, Nur Sahid; a representative from BOS Switzerland, Elisabeth Labes; and Ari Kusuma Dewa from PT Total I&E Endonesie – all of whom who have kindly supported our work.

Back at the Samboja Lestari clinic, our technicians were making final checks on the transport cages and our medical team was preparing medical supplies and equipment needed for transporting the orangutans from Samboja Lestari to their final release points in the forest.

After the press conference, our guests symbolically ‘released’ the orangutans.

Preparations at Samboja Lestari

During all of our release events we strive to ensure the process is as smooth as possible for the orangutans and all five orangutans were sedated in the Forest School 2 area prior to being transferred to their respective transport cages. Raymond was first, followed by Gadis, Angely, Hope and then Kenji.

Raymond

This process was completed by 3 p.m., and the team then waited for all of the orangutans to wake from sedation as it is not safe to transport them whilst asleep. Our team need to be satisfied each orangutan has recovered with no ill effects and is able to sit up well.

Once all were awake the five cages were loaded onto a waiting truck near the clinic.

Welcome to the Wild!

The convoy, which consisted of five double-cabined utility vehicles and one truck, travelled along a road that passed by Samarinda, Sangatta and Bontang, and finally to Muara Wahau. The team stopped every two hours throughout the 12-hour trip to check on the orangutans.

At Muara Wahau, the last town stop, the team took a break and regrouped before continuing on to the edge of the Kehje Sewen Forest – a 5-hour ride from Muara Wahau.

The rocky road that led to the Kehje Sewen Forest proved more difficult to navigate than expected. We had to leave one double-cabin utility behind that was unable to traverse the steep hill.

When we arrived at the end of the road, where vehicles can go no further, a waiting group of local Dayak Wehea traditional dancers performed a ritual called “Tel kiak tloh jiep seak lekok”, which means “Welcoming ritual of safety and friendship with the Borneo Wehea universe”. Our group included several international partner members, who were delighted by this warm welcome.

Following the ritual, the team carried the cages down a steep 200-metre trail to the banks of the Telen River, then crossed the waters and headed to the release points.

Negotiating the forest took some time, and the team were finally able to set the cages down and open them by 3 p.m. that day.

Our Post-Release Monitoring (PRM) team begun observing and taking notes on the orangutans and their activities immediately following their release, and kept doing so until the five started to build their night nests. Later that night, our PRM team happily reported that Angely, Hope, Gadis, Raymond and Kenji appeared to be adapting to their new environment and had been observed foraging. It was great to hear that the five were already enjoying forest food.

We hope Angely, Hope, Gadis, Raymond and Kenji enjoy their freedom and continue to thrive in their new home – in the safety of Kehje Sewen Forest.

 Text by: BOSF Communication Team in  HQ

In celebration of the BOS Foundation’s 25th anniversary this year, we hope that the orangutans will continue to live safely in their new natural habitat. We will do our best to continuously monitor their progress and look forward to some new exciting reports on their adaptation this year! You can keep support our team and our monitoring activities. DONATE NOW to BOS Foundation and make a difference to the future survival of orangutans!