Archives: May 2016

[PRESS RELEASE] The BOS Foundation to Release Five More Orangutans in East Kalimantan

May 27, 2016. Posted in Article

To mark its 25th anniversary and commemorate World Environment Day, which falls annually on June 5, the BOS Foundation will soon release five orangutans to the Kehje Sewen Forest.

Samboja, East Kalimantan, May 27, 2016. The BOS Foundation, in collaboration with the East Kalimantan Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA), is preparing to release five orangutans from the BOSF Samboja Lestari East Kalimantan Orangutan Reintroduction Program to the Kehje Sewen Forest, located in East Kutai and Kutai Kertanegara Regencies.

With the release of these five, the total number of orangutans released to the Kehje Sewen Forest by the BOS Foundation will reach 45 (with 40 previously released between 2012- 2015).

The three males and two females will be transported overland from the Samboja Lestari Centre to Muara Wahau, the sub-regent capital of East Kutai Regency. The journey will take about 12 hours, with the team making pit stops every two hours to check the orangutans. From Muara Wahau, the trip will take another five hours to reach a point which is located about 200 metres from the Telen River at the edge of the Kehje Sewen Forest, where land vehicles can go no further. The transport cages will then be carefully carried to the riverbank and loaded onto a small boat called a ‘ces, which will take us across the river. The cages will then be loaded onto 4×4 vehicles for the last leg of the journey to the designated release points in the Kehje Sewen Forest.

Drh. Agus Irwanto, Program Manager at Samboja Lestari: “We at Samboja Lestari are delighted to release more of our rehabilitated orangutans. These five orangutans, named Angely, Gadis, Kenji, Hope and Raymond, will soon be given back their freedom in the Kehje Sewen Forest. They have completed the rehabilitation process; some have been here for nine years. They all are ready to live in the wild, following the other 40 previously released orangutans, and we all hope they can generate a new wild population in the forest.”

Kehje Sewen is a 86,450 hectare rainforest in East Kalimantan managed as an Ecosystem Restoration Concession (ERC) by PT RHOI (Restorasi Habitat Orangutan Indonesia). The BOS Foundation purchased this ERC in 2010, specifically to enable us to release rehabilitated orangutans.

Dr. Aldrianto Priadjati, Director of Forest Conservation for RHOI warmly welcomes the event: “Our job is to make sure all rehabilitated orangutans are ready for release, and that after release they thrive and adapt well to their new environment. Our highly dedicated team conducts post-release monitoring on a daily basis in the forest. We are also currently working on obtaining more forest areas to be used for future releases in the Kehje Sewen Forest, and other forests in East and Central Kalimantan. We expect optimum support from all stakeholders to realize this, for we still have hundreds of orangutans waiting to be released.”

Head of the East Kalimantan Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA), Ir. Sunandar Trigunajasa N., said, “The release of orangutans by the BOS Foundation is a truly wonderful thing, for animal and habitat conservation is our collective responsibility. Orangutans are protected by law, and we should always put this into perspective when developing land in our province. Let’s concentrate our collective effort on supporting the conservation of our rich, natural resources.”

Dr. Ir. Jamartin Sihite, CEO of the BOS Foundation, said, “Last year our program faced a very serious threat. More than 150 hectares of forest surrounding Samboja Lestari was destroyed by fire. There is nowhere in East Kalimantan capable of accommodating our 200 orangutans, should we need to evacuate them all. We need participation from everyone to make sure this will not happen again. The East Kalimantan BKSDA and other authorities have been generously supporting our efforts, nevertheless we still need much firmer law enforcement to help protect orangutans and their habitat in East Kalimantan.”

This release is only made possible with cooperation between the BOS Foundation and the East Kalimantan BKSDA, the Provincial Government of East Kalimantan, the local government of East Kutai and Kutai Kartanegara regencies, and the local residents of said regencies. The BOS Foundation is extremely grateful for the moral and financial support provided by BOS Switzerland, PT Total E&P Indonesia, PT Pupuk Kaltim, individual donors, and other partners and organizations from around the world concerned with orangutan conservation in Indonesia.

Contact:

Paulina Laurensia

Communications Specialist

Email: pauline@orangutan.or.id

Suwardi

Communications Staff Samboja Lestari

Email: ardy@orangutan.or.id

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Editor’s Note:

ABOUT THE BOS FOUNDATION

Founded In 1991, the BOS Foundation is a non-profit Indonesian organization dedicated to the conservation of Bornean orangutans and their habitats, working together with local communities, the Ministry of Environment and Forestry of the Republic of Indonesia and international partner organizations.

Currently, the BOS Foundation is working to rehabilitate more than 700 orangutans with the support of 400 highly dedicated staff and experts in primatology, biodiversity, ecology, forest rehabilitation, agroforestry, community empowerment, communications, education, and orangutan welfare. For further information, please visit www.orangutan.or.id.

 

ABOUT PT RHOI

PT Restorasi Habitat Orangutan Indonesia (RHOI) is a company established by the BOS Foundation on April 21, 2009, solely to acquire the Utilization of Forest Timber Products license through Restoration of the Ecosystem (IUPHHK-RE), also known as Ecosystem Restoration Concession (ERC).

As a non-profit organisation, the BOS Foundation is not permitted to apply for certain licenses due to government regulations. Hence, RHOI was established. On August 18, 2010, RHOI was issued an ERC permit, giving them the authority to use and manage 86,450 hectares of rainforest in East Kutai and Kutai Kertanegara Regencies, East Kalimantan. The permit gives RHOI the authority to manage a concession area – in this case, a forest area – which is imperative in the planning and implementation of orangutan releases.

This concession provides a sustainable and secure habitat for orangutans for at least 60 years, with the option of extending for another 35 years. Issued by the Ministry of Forestry, this ERC license cost around US$1.4 million, which was funded by generous donations from donors and the BOS Foundation’s partner organizations in Europe, Australia and the US.

The forest’s name, ‘Kehje Sewen’, translates as ‘orangutan’ in local Dayak Wehea language. By name and nature, the Kehje Sewen Forest has become a forest for orangutans. For more information, please visit www.theforestforever.com.

CANDIDATE PROFILES of SAMBOJA LESTARI’s 8th ORANGUTAN RELEASE

May 26, 2016. Posted in Article

To mark its 25th anniversary and commemorate World Environment Day, which falls annually on June 5, the BOS Foundation will journey with 5 orangutans from the BOS Foundation East Kalimantan Orangutan Reintroduction Program in Samboja Lestari and head to prepared release points in the Kehje Sewen Forest. Here are the release candidates’ profiles

Angely

Angely was rescued by the Tenggarong Regional Section II Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA) from a local villager in Kaliorang Sub Regency, East Kutai, who was illegally keeping her as a pet. She arrived at Samboja Lestari on June 18, 2010, when she was 1-year-old. When she first arrived, Angely was very scared and traumaitised and resisted being carried or handled by technicians.

Angely has since grown into a smart and independent individual and now attends Forest School Level 2, where she spends her days eagerly exploring and actively moving through the trees.

Angely is now seven years old, weighs 23 kilograms and has thin, darkish-brown hair. Six years of rehabilitation at Samboja Lestari has seen Angely acquire many vital survival skills, and she is now ready to taste freedom in the Kehje Sewen Forest.

Kenji

Kenji was rescued by the Tenggarong Regional Section II Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA) from a local villager in Tenggarong who claimed he had found him near a oil palm plantation in Wanasari village. Kenji was discovered in a poor condition, with a wound on his hip thought to have been inflicted by a machete. He was a distressed and traumatised 1-year-old then, who resisted being held or carried.

Kenji entered rehabilitation at Samboja Lestari on October 17, 2010, where he joined the Forest School baby group. Six years on, Kenji is now in Forest School Level 2 and has become very adept at identifying natural forest food. These days, Kenji likes to sleep in the Forest School and is easily recognised by his thin, darkish-brown hair.

After learning all he can at the Samboja Lestari Orangutan Rehabilitation Center, Kenji will soon move to the Kehje Sewen Forest, where he will spend the rest of his days living in the wild.

Hope

Hope was rescued by the East Kalimantan Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA) from a local resident in Balikpapan on October 17, 2010. He came to Samboja Lestari in poor condition and was unable to sit and eat. The centre was actually full when he arrived, but the 1-year-old was in desperate need of immediate help, so space was made and our medical team quickly provided much-needed intensive treatment. It took two months and endless dedication from our team to see Hope make a full recovery.

Hope and his friends now learn and play together daily in the Forest School. He has grown wonderfully independent and is very good at foraging for natural food and constructing nests.

Handsome Hope is now six years old, weighs 27 kilograms, and has a rather muscular physique. He will soon return to his natural habitat of the Kehje Sewen Forest, in East Kalimantan.

Gadis

Gadis was five years old and weighed 23 kilograms when she was handed over by PT. Gunung Bayan Prima Coal West Kutai to the BOS Foundation’s Samboja Lestari Centre on February 20, 2014. She came to us unconscious and suffering from typhoid fever, and our medical team quickly responded by giving her intensive treatment at the clinic. Luckily, Gadis recovered and then started on her long road to rehabilitation.

Gadis has never ceased to amaze us during her time in the Forest School. With her blackish-brown hair, Gadis is popular among the males, yet prefers to be alone. Gadis can easily identify forest food, is very active up in the trees, and has sound nest-building skills.

This now 7-year-old beauty, weighing 33 kilograms, is ready to embark on a new journey: living in the the Kehje Sewen Forest.

Raymond

Raymond arrived at Samboja Lestari on April 27, 2007, after being rescued by the East Kalimantan BKSDA from a local villager in Bontang, East Kalimantan. At the time he was only eight months old, weighed 3.6 kilograms, and was severely traumatised. He instinctively avoided human contact. After completing quarantine, Raymond joined other baby orangutans in the Forest School nursery group. Over time, Raymond has grown into a great individual and is now in Forest School Group 2.

Raymond has thin, blackish-brown hair and is easily identified by his wide forehead and small eyes. He becomes agitated whenever he encounters a human unknown to him and is one of the more dominant figures in his group. In the Forest School, Raymond is very active up in the trees and is an avid explorer with a good sense of where to find natural food.

Raymond is now nine years old and weighs 29 kilograms. With the skills he has learned at the Samboja Lestari Orangutan Rehabilitation Center, Raymond is more than ready to start living as a wild orangutan in the Kehje Sewen Forest.

Nocturnal Critters of the Kehje Sewen Forest

May 24, 2016. Posted in Article

Just as the orangutans of Kehje Sewen Forest start settling in their evening nests, nocturnal creatures come out of their hidey-holes to begin their ‘day’. The PRM team often encounters night critters when conducting nest-to-nest monitoring.

Our PRM team in the Kehje Sewen Forest recently came across a critically endangered mammal; the pangolin (Manis javanica), known locally as trenggiling, near Camp Nles Mamse. Covered from head to tail in scales, the pangolin rolls itself into a ball whenever it senses danger. Sadly, pangolins are hunted for their perceived medical benefits.

Manis javanica by luy (3)

Pangolin (Manis javanica)

The team has also met a masked palm civet (Paguma lavarta), known locally as musang galing. This mammal is both arboreal (lives in the trees) and terrestrial (lives on the ground). The musang galing is easy to recognize with its unique pale face, reddish hair, and white-tipped tail. Its neck, ears and tail are dark brown.

Musang (Paguma larvata)

Masked Palm Civet (Paguma lavarta)

The Malaysian civet, or musang Tenggalung Malaya (Viverra tangalunga), is another nocturnal animal often seen in the Kehje Sewen Forest. The musang Tenggalung Malaya, which has greyish hair with black dots and a black stripe along its dorsal down to its tail, can be found in primary and secondary lowland and mountain areas. This species of civet is terrestrial and feeds on small invertebrates and vertebrates.

musang (Viverra tangalunga)

Malay Civet (Viverra tangalunga)

The slow loris, or kukang bukang, also lives happily in the Kehje Sewen Forest. This tiny animal, which has a very short tail and a brown, pale-grey colour with black rings around its eyes, spends most of its time up in the trees eating fruit. It might look slow, but the kukang bukang is quick enough to capture insects, its favourite food.

Kukang bukang (Nycticebus coucang)

Slow loris (Nycticebus coucang)

Sadly, in Indonesia nocturnal animals such as these are often hunted for domestication or as a food source. In an ideal world, they would be left alone to live and breed freely in their natural habitat instead of being held captive or eaten by humans.

Text by: PRM team in Kehje Sewen Forest

In celebration of the BOS Foundation’s 25th anniversary this year, we hope that the orangutans will continue to live safely in their new natural habitat. We will do our best to continuously monitor their progress and look forward to some new exciting reports on their adaptation this year! You can keep support our team and our monitoring activities. DONATE NOW to BOS Foundation and make a difference to the future survival of orangutans!

Ajeng the Fabulous Forager

May 10, 2016. Posted in Article

Our PRM team from Nles Mamse Camp recently observed Ajeng over a period of several days, and were delighted to witness her progress since her release into the Kehje Sewen Forest.

The team noted that Ajeng spent most of her time alone foraging. She was spotted on occasion together with Hanung, but seemed to prefer ranging on her own. During observations, Ajeng looked healthy and had a good appetite, with PRM-team data showing that eating dominated her daily activities. The team saw her eat a lot of fruit, young leaves, shoots and termites, which are abundant in the forest. She stayed up in the trees to eat fruit and only climbed down to look for shoots and termites.

Ajeng by rusda (3)

During observations Ajeng came across a group of rattan shoots climbing up into a tree. She quickly grabbed them, then still dangling on the branch of the tree, she quickly peeled the thorny rattan bark using her teeth to expose the soft interior. After preparing her snack, Ajeng then moved herself to a more comfortable position to eat uninterrupted.

Ajeng eating rattan shoots, which can grow to more than one meter

Ajeng eating rattan shoots, which can grow to more than one meter

Kecombrang (Etlingera sp.) shoots also seem to be one of Ajeng’s favourite forest foods. She found a patch of vegetation filled with kecombrang shoots and slowly devoured her fill. Kecombrang shoots, which are smaller than rattan shoots, also produce a flower that orangutans love to eat.

Ajeng eating kecombrang shoots

Ajeng eating kecombrang shoots

Termites are a great source of protein for orangutans, and Ajeng seems to love these too. Termites are very adept at building solid nests on the forest floor, yet they present little challenge for a clever orangutan like Ajeng, who used branches and tree trunks to break them open to reach the termites.

Ajeng eating termites

Ajeng eating termites

As with a wild orangutan, Ajeng dislikes being followed. She was continuously recorded kiss-squeaking and throwing twigs at the team members whenever she sensed their presence. Ajeng has proven she has adapted very well to her new home.

Text by: PRM team in Nles Mamse Camp, Kehje Sewen Forest

In celebration of the BOS Foundation’s 25th anniversary this year, we hope that the orangutans will continue to live safely in their new natural habitat. We will do our best to continuously monitor their progress and look forward to some new exciting reports on their adaptation this year! You can keep support our team and our monitoring activities. DONATE NOW to BOS Foundation and make a difference to the future survival of orangutans!

Bungan Adapts Well to Life in the Kehje Sewen Forest

May 3, 2016. Posted in Article

Our PRM team in Nles Mamse camp recently conducted a nest-to-nest observation on Bungan. Nest-to-nest observation involves the team following an orangutan from the moment they wake up in their nest, until they build a new nest later that day. It didn’t take long for our team to see that Bungan has indeed adapted well to life in the Kehje Sewen Forest.

The weather was quite unpredictable that day and the midday heat was intense. When the heat got the better of Bungan, the team saw her dangle from a tree on the riverbank and dip her hands in the water to splash her hot face.

She then went back to exploring the Kehje Sewen Forest and foraged for natural food.

Bungan eating umbut Etlingera, a forest root

After finishing her meal, Bungan rested for a moment and then surprised the team when she broke off a small twig and used it to pick her nose! She snapped off another twig to clean her ears.

Orangutans are intelligent creatures and will use sticks and other forest ‘tools’ for various purposes; for building nests and digging out termites – and for personal hygiene, it would seem!

To see Bungan using twigs for self-grooming truly amazed us. It is wonderful to see how easily she has adapted to her new surroundings.

We are excited to see Bungan, who was released in December 2015, living a healthy and peaceful life in the natural surrounds of the Kehje Sewen Forest.

Text by: PRM team in Camp Nles Mamse, Kehje Sewen Forest

In celebration of the BOS Foundation’s 25th anniversary this year, we hope that the orangutans will continue to live safely in their new natural habitat. We will do our best to continuously monitor their progress and look forward to some new exciting reports on their adaptation this year! You can keep support our team and our monitoring activities. DONATE NOW to BOS Foundation and make a difference to the future survival of orangutans!