Archives: April 2016

Catching up with Casey in Kehje Sewen

April 19, 2016. Posted in Article

This week, our PRM team from Camp Lesik, in the Kehje Sewen Forest, went on patrol in Peapong. We tried multiple times to pick up orangutan signals in the area, but to no avail. After walking along the riverbank for a while, we noticed some movements from across the river. It turned out to be Casey!

We last saw Casey in August 2015, when she was spotted with Lesan (Read the full story here: Meeting with Lesan and Casey). We were excited to catch up with her again, and quickly took out our notebooks to start observations for the next two hours.

Casey appeared very healthy, with a fuller body. This indicates to us that she is thriving in the Kehje Sewen Forest.

Casey by handoko

Casey by awal

That particular day, we saw Casey eat many shoots before she took a rest.

Casey makan umbut by handoko

Minutes after settling down for her rest, rain started to fall and Casey sat up on a branch, took some leafy twigs and arranged them into a makeshift umbrella. Casey has now been living wild in Kehje Sewen for four years, almost to the day – and it is clear she has adapted well to her new environment as an independent, wild orangutan.

The rain eased off, but the evening sky began to turn dark and we could hear the approaching sounds of thunder. We completed our observations on Casey and returned to Camp Lesik to share our news with the rest of the team.

It was very heart-warming to see Casey once again, livingin Kehje Sewen Forest.

Text by: PRM team in Camp Lesik, Kehje Sewen Forest

In celebration of the BOS Foundation’s 25th anniversary this year, we hope that the orangutans will continue to live safely in their new natural habitat. We will do our best to continuously monitor their progress and look forward to some new exciting reports on their adaptation this year! You can keep support our team and our monitoring activities. DONATE NOW to BOS Foundation and make a difference to the future survival of orangutans!

April 18, 2016. Posted in Article

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Amazing Mother Yayang and her Second Baby, Louise

April 5, 2016. Posted in Article

Sum, our chef at Camp Lesik in the Kehje Sewen Forest, recently saw a female orangutan with a baby clinging to her belly not far from the camp. We believe it must have been none other than Yayang and her baby! When we released stories about Yayang’s newborn in July 2015 (Read full story here: Breaking News: Yayang Has Given Birth to a New Baby!), this beautiful baby had yet to be named. We needed time to assure the baby’s sex and it took us a couple of monitoring before we were finally able to determine that it is a baby girl. We now call her Louise!

Louise by awal (2)

Louise

For several weeks, we were not able to locate Yayang and Louise visually, nor detect Yayang’s signal. When we eventually found them, they both appeared in very good condition, healthy and active. We felt so relieved. A team that had just returned from a day patrol quickly set off to monitor the pair’s movements until Yayang built a nest for the night: We deliberately waited for them to settle in the nest, so we would know where to start monitoring the following day.

Nest-to-nest monitoring involves leaving camp before sunrise to locate an orangutan’s nest and then take notes on their movements every two minutes for the whole day, until the orangutan finally builds another nest to sleep for the night again. On this particular day, Handoko and Awal rose at 5 a.m. and went to the nest where Yayang and her baby had spent the night. There, they found Yayang with her clinging Louise, eating Arthocarpus fruit from a nearby tree.

Yayang eating Arthocarpus fruit

Yayang dan Louise makan Artocarpus sp by emily

Louise learns from Yayang how to identify Arthocarpus fruit

Louise appeared to be quite agile, at times letting go off her mother’s belly to reach out for nearby twigs. Yayang pulled Louise closer to her whenever she started to wander off, but this did not seem to stop Louise from trying. The baby seemed to be rather curious, and we even spotted her licking moss – perhaps having a taste-test? Her attentive mother quickly stopped her.

Louise makan lumut by lung

Louise licking moss on a tree

We monitored the pair for four days straight and observed them actively moving through the trees and consuming large volumes of forest fruits and shoots daily.

We were thrilled to see Louise is growing well, and felt privileged to be able to document the moments Yayang patiently protects and teaches her second offspring.

Yayang’s first baby girl, Sayang, is now independent and was recently seen spending time with Hamzah not far from Camp Lesik (Read the full story here: Hamzah and Sayang Spotted Near Camp Lesik).

The team reflected happily on how lovingly Yayang had taught Sayang to live independently, and how it was now time for her to focus on Louise: May she, like her extraordinary mother, become another amazing figure in the beautiful Kehje Sewen Forest.

Text by: PRM team at Camp Lesik, Kehje Sewen Forest

In celebration of the BOS Foundation’s 25th anniversary this year, we hope that the orangutans will continue to live safely in their new natural habitat. We will do our best to continuously monitor their progress and look forward to some new exciting reports on their adaptation this year! You can keep support our team and our monitoring activities. DONATE NOW to BOS Foundation and make a difference to the future survival of orangutans!